Why I started using Haiku

I have dual boot setup on my computer with Arch Linux and Haiku. Arch Linux is my primary operating system, but when I want to relax or have a little more fun I boot into Haiku.

I started using Haiku about six months ago, and for a pretty simple reason. It’s an entire operating system made by one group of people.

GNU/Linux is made of different pieces of software written by different people from different places at different times. It’s a collection of multiple options for kernels, window managers, desktop environments, libraries, sound systems, boot managers, and on and on.

GNU/Linux works, and works very well in my opinion, but I was looking for something different, something with more of a complete design in mind. I wanted something that had the consistency of Mac OS X with the freedom of a free and open source license. FreeBSD meets that criteria if I exclude a graphical user interface.

I looked into alternative operating systems and Haiku fit my criteria well. It’s a complete and unified operating system from boot to GUI, including an API for everything I need. It has very active development, and a nice, yet small, set of applications to use, including a native WebKit web browser.

Haiku is a remake of BeOS. I have never used BeOS before, but found out I really like using my computer the “BeOS way”. Compared to other operating systems and user interfaces, I prefer to use Haiku. I like the consistency between applications. I like the responsiveness of the user interface. I like the clean look and nice default settings. I like the simplicity of installing and uninstalling applications. I find that the user interface better fits my work flow.

I’m excited about Haiku having a stable release some day, whenever that is. I’m also excited about writing some applications for it, but I can’t really think of what to make. I’ll probably start by just converting my video game to native Haiku code.

2 Comments

  1. - says:

    aha. of the current \getting there\ oses, haiku looks nearest to \there\ and moving fastest.

    \I’m also excited about writing some applications for it, but I can’t really think of what to make. I’ll probably start by just converting my video game to native Haiku code.\
    i’d have to dig thru my bookmarks, but there are only a few big sites for haiku. one focuses on apps.
    but I understand why you might not *yet* want to rewrite your game for an OS that’s not yet release.

  2. drcouzelis says:

    Thank you for the comment.

    In regards to software development for Haiku, besides making a native version of my video game for Haiku, I recently thought of a nice project to help me (and hopefully others) ease into Haiku application development. I will be making a collection of very small applications, each showing one feature of the Haiku API. That way, anyone can take them and either study them or use them as a base to start writing a new application. I applied for a project page on osdrawer.net, but haven’t heard from them yet.