I’m thankful for Arch Linux

I had four days off from work this week thanks to Thanksgiving, and I decided to spend a lot of that time trying out some operating systems. Here are my extremely simple, quick, superficial experiences.

Slackware

I used to be a Slackware user, as can be seen in my Linux history. I appreciate that the outstanding installation program hasn’t changed since the last time I used it in 2003. I was excited to use a very stable and nicely setup system with KDE.

Well, I was reminded why I don’t like KDE. First of all, I find the default appearance to be incredible ugly. Second, there are so many little applications working together that make up KDE, and one of them always seems to be either crashing or causing a graphical glitch. So, I erased Slackware.

Fedora

I was interested in trying GNOME 3. After looking around a bit, I realized Fedora was the only major distribution that comes with the standard GNOME 3 Shell by default.

I realized I don’t like GNOME 3. Everything just took so much mouse movement and so much clicking. Maybe I was using it incorrectly. Anyway, I erased Fedora.

Frugalware

I wanted to try Frugalware because it’s one of the only distributions that comes with the Etoile Desktop Environment, based on GNUStep. Frugalware didn’t like it when I told it not to install the boot loader into the MBR. I couldn’t get it to boot after that, so I gave up trying to get it to load.

MenuetOS

I love MenuetOS. I love the story of MenuetOS. A programmer is fed up with people always saying “Sure, assembly language is incredibly fast, but it’s impossible to write any big or serious application with it”, and so he decides to write an entire operating system in assembly language. That includes both the kernel and the GUI (with transparency effects!). It has a text editor, web browser, image editor, music / video / DVD player, Doom, and Quake.

I was able to run it from a live CD. Unfortunately my USB mouse was not detected, but I was able to move the mouse cursor around with some keyboard shortcuts (Ctrl – Meta – arrows / space). If it had worked, I would have installed it onto a partition, just for the geek cred.

openSUSE

My wife liked openSUSE from her experience from a few years ago, so I decided to give it a try. What a beautiful and polished experience openSUSE is! The installer is amazing and the default setup is gorgeous (even with KDE!). So I decided to keep it as another platform to compile and test the video game I’m making on.

…until I discovered two simple packages I need (Allegro and GNUStep) are not in the openSUSE repositories. I’m going kind of crazy. These are pretty basic packages. Does openSUSE really not provide them? I searched and searched on the Internet, but I don’t think I care enough to look into it much further. So, I’ll probably erase openSUSE.

And this is the point when I started to realize something about package managers: they don’t provide any useful information. The first thing I do when installing a new OS is apply updates. These new GUI package managers don’t tell me what is being downloaded or how much is left. It’s like a window that says “Click here to update”, then “Updating…”, then “Done.”. I’m sure it’s possible to see the details somehow, but it sure wasn’t obvious to me.

FreeBSD

I plan on keeping FreeBSD for two reasons: to tinker with and learn on, and to test the video game I’m making on another operating system. It’ll become one of my primary three operating systems.

So, in the end, I end up triple booting Arch Linux, Haiku, and FreeeBSD. I’d still like to have some sort of popular fancy Linux distribution installed, so I might try out Linux Mint with Cinnamon if I have some more time.

I had fun trying out some new operating systems. It’s been three years since I started using Arch Linux and lost any desire to do any more distro hopping. But trying them out again has made me realize how thankful I am for Arch Linux.

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