Python 3 Web Framework

I got it in my head this weekend that it was about time someone wrote a web framework for Python 3. My head is kind of stubborn about these things, so I asked it some questions:

Does the world need another web framework?
Do I need another web framework?
Do I have time to do this?

The answers were all “no.” Still, I’m planning to go ahead with it until I get bored. Then the project can sit and collect dust with all my others.

A bit of discussion with The Cactus, led to a few ideas:

I discovered that QP is apparently the “first Python-3 enabled web framework.” I didn’t try it, so I was perhaps unfair in discarding it, but it doesn’t look… suitable.

I looked around some more, and found that CherryPy is about to release a Python 3 enabled version. I’m sure that will spawn a whole slough of Python 3 frameworks built around CherryPy. I considered such a plan (I’d call it ChokeCherryPy based on a receipe my mom devised): create some kind of templating system based on str.format, some session support, and some kind of database module wrapped around py-postgresql. Could be fun. But I’d end up with a mess of third-party technologies much like TurboGears, and that would be embarrassing, plus I’m sure the TG team already has people working on this.

Then I came back to my original plan, which was to port either Tornado or web.py to Python 3. Tornado looks like a smaller codebase (easier to port) and I’ve never used it before, so it’s also a chance to learn something new. So today I forked Tornado on github and run 2to3 on it. I’ve already got the “hello world” demo running; it wasn’t too hard once I figured out the difference between bytes and strings. At least, I think I did that part correctly.

The project is named psyclone, a little play on the ‘destructive weather patterns’ genre. I was close to p3clone, but it’s too hard to convince people it should be pronounced ‘cyclone’.

This isn’t a project I expect to go anywhere; django will be ported to Python 3 soon enough, and other frameworks will be popping up all over. But I’ve been working with Python 3 a lot lately, and I thought it was time to tackle the ‘scary’ job of porting an existing app. It’s tedious, but not difficult.

Comments are closed.